Latest Sightings

Archives:

July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006

current posts

 
Fri 27th February 2009 17:40 by James McGill
The mild weather has been good for early flying species like this Spring Usher.

1932 Spring Usher

What would be good is if someone could catch Small Brindled Beauty again. It is doing well in other parts of the country but is now much rarer here than in the early 1990s.

link
Fri 27th February 2009 17:03 by Bill Urwin
Larval Searches
Now is a great time to look at Hart's Tongue Fern for feeding signs of the micro Psychoides filicivora. The larva feeds on the spore cases of the Hart's tongue Fern which at this time of year are rusty brown. Feeding signs are typically raised areas on the spore cases that look like the stuffing is being pulled out of a cushion. A picture of the larva is below, note the brown head and prothoracic plate. The closely related P. verhuella is also found in Somerset; the larva of that species has a blackish head, prothoracic plate and anal plate.

200 Psychoides filicivora larva BU

Psychoides filicivora larva

link
Fri 27th February 2009 15:08 by Bill Urwin
Face to face with a Clouded Drab. Two more unusual angles on a moth.

2188 Clouded Drab Face BU

Why the Drab Face?

2188 Clouded Drab Foot BU

Feather Foot

link
Wed 25th February 2009 22:47 by Bill Urwin
A much quieter night so far, with the only moth of note being a single Tortricodes alternella.

1025 Tortricodes alternella BU2

Tortricodes alternella

link
Wed 25th February 2009 19:46 by Bill Urwin
Some pics of the common moths that are visiting at this time of year.

1930 Oak Beauty BU2

Oak Beauty

2187 Common Quaker BU2

Common Quaker

2190 Hebrew Character BU2

Hebrew Character

1932 Spring Usher BU3

Spring Usher

link
Wed 25th February 2009 12:49 by John Bebbington
Langport, night of 24 Feb 09
A better night in my garden, too - 5 Common Quaker, 3 Hebrew Character and a Chestnut as well as 3 Acleris which I can't ID from the UK Moths website. I have sent images to James.

James has come back very quickly with IDs - many thanks!
1050 Acleris boscana Langport
1050 Acleris boscana
1052 Acleris umbrana Langport 2
1052 Acleris umbrana

link
Wed 25th February 2009 11:06 by Ian Mathieson
4 Hebrew Characters, 3 Common Quakers, Dark Chestnut and a Chestnut in the trap last night.
link
Wed 25th February 2009 09:59 by Peter Tennant
Whitefield, Wiveliscombe - min temp 8 degrees

A better catch included our first Oak Beauty for the year - a lovely fresh specimen outside the trap and at an actinic light in a window an Oak Nycteoline which seems from the Somerset records to be a very early reappearance of this hibernator. Hope its a good omen for the season to come.

link
Wed 25th February 2009 08:52 by Bill Urwin
A better night last night with 7 Common Quaker, 1 Small Quaker, 6 Hebrew Character, 2 Spring Usher, 1 Oak Beauty and 1 Grey Shoulder Knot.

The first Small Eggar should be about soon, I shall probably trap for it this weekend to see if I can scrape in a February record.

2237 Grey Shoulder Knot BU

Grey Shoulder Knot

link
Tue 24th February 2009 13:08 by Peter Tennant
Whitefield, Wiveliscombe

The spring season is slowly starting and over the week-end we had a Common Quaker, a Hebrew Character, a well-marked Dotted Border and of the hibernators a Red-green Carpet, several Chestnuts and Satellites.

link
Tue 24th February 2009 10:12 by John Bebbington
Langport, 24 Feb 09
No trap last night, but one Double-striped Pug on the kitchen window.

I've just (1240) seen a Peacock butterfly in the garden.

link
Fri 20th February 2009 09:41 by Peter Tennant
Whitefield, Wiveliscombe - Min temp 3 degrees

Four firsts for 2009 - March Moth, Pale Brindled Beauty, Dotted Border and Acleris literana.

link
Thu 19th February 2009 17:13 by John Bebbington
Langport, 18 Feb 09
Despite a minimum temperature of 8˚C there were only 3 moths in the trap - 2 Dark Chestnut and 1 Hebrew Character.
link
Tue 17th February 2009 19:33 by Ian Mathieson
New for the year last night were Hebrew Character, Satellite and Dark Chestnut. Out of 6 different species that I have caught so far this year, 3 of them, Satellite, Dark Chestnut and Pale Brindled Beauty were not seen by me last year.
link
Tue 17th February 2009 12:35 by Peter Tennant
Whitefield, Wiveliscombe - min temp 6 degrees

Five different species attracted to the trap last night made us feel that spring has arrived. Early Moth (3) Spring Usher and of the hibernators Satellite, Dark Chestnut and Grey Shoulder-knot.  The last named was, as is usual here, not in the trap but on the fence near it.

link
Sun 15th February 2009 18:29 by Bill Urwin
A much warmer day today and already this evening I have caught 1 Spring Usher.
link
Sun 15th February 2009 10:24 by Bill Urwin
My first trapping session of 2009 produced one moth, a Pale Brindled Beauty. This is only the second time I have recorded this species in my garden.

1926 Pale Brindled Beauty BU2

Pale Brindled Beauty

link
Sat 14th February 2009 16:47 by Peter Tennant
Whitefield Corner, Wiveliscombe - minimum 4 degrees

At last better weather encouraged us to put out the trap for the first time in February and we had our first Early Moth for 2009 and yet another Winter Moth - it has been a good season for them.

On an ornithological note - During the cold snap we have seen a number of Wrens going to roost in a House Martins nest under our eaves. Last night they started to arrive at 5.40 pm. and I counted a minimum of 12 and I probably missed some in the dusk.  Most fly directly into the nest but some climb labouriously up the pebble-dash wall - they must be squashed in there!

link
Sat 14th February 2009 08:01 by Ian Mathieson
My second trapping of the year overnight 12th/13th February produced my 2nd and 3rd moths of the year. These were a Pale Brindled Beauty and an Early Moth. Last year I failed to record Pale Brindled Beauty for the first time since 2002 so it was good to fill in the gap again.
link
Fri 13th February 2009 16:00 by John Bebbington
Two male colour forms of 1932 Spring Usher
No trapping for a while now but hoping for warmer nights ...
Here are two male colour forms of Spring Usher, the first from North Wales (photographed in 1976) and the second from Surrey (photographed in 1992).
1932 Spring Usher male 11932 Spring Usher male 2
link
Wed 4th February 2009 23:05 by Bill Urwin
Genitalia Workshop
Saturday 28th March Identifying difficult moths by genitalia led by Jon Clifton. Burnham-on-Sea Community Infants School, Winchester Road, Burnham-on-Sea, Somerset, TA8 1JD. 10:30 - 16:00. Aimed at existing moth recorders with no experience of identifying moths by genitalia examination. Advanced booking essential: 01929 406009 or nmrs@butterfly-conservation.org

The usual itinerary for Jon’s dissection workshops is as follows:

1. Introduction and discussion to ‘why we have to dissect’.

2. Chemicals used and their safety.

3. Dissection of a male macro moth.

4. Making a slide prep from the above.

5. Dissection of a female macro moth.

6. Students turn to do their own dissection. Please bring along specimens.

7. Describing of other techniques.

8. Species that can be determined in situ such as the November moths.

8. Rounding up, questions and answers.

link
Wed 4th February 2009 22:04 by Bill Urwin
Genitalia Workshop
Saturday 28th March Identifying difficult moths by genitalia led by Jon Clifton. Burnham-on-Sea Community Infants School, Winchester Road, Burnham-on-Sea, Somerset, TA8 1JD. 10:30 - 16:00. Aimed at existing moth recorders with no experience of identifying moths by genitalia examination. Advanced booking essential: 01929 406009 or nmrs@butterfly-conservation.org

The usual itinerary for Jon’s dissection workshops is as follows:

1. Introduction and discussion to ‘why we have to dissect’.

2. Chemicals used and their safety.

3. Dissection of a male macro moth.

4. Making a slide prep from the above.

5. Dissection of a female macro moth.

6. Students turn to do their own dissection. Please bring along specimens.

7. Describing of other techniques.

8. Species that can be determined in situ such as the November moths.

8. Rounding up, questions and answers.

link

Copyright © Somerset Moth Group 2017 Privacy Policy Terms of Use Cookies